How to shopping on the market

How to shopping on the market

Shopping is a way of life, and people are accustomed to the practice as they aim to acquire or replace assets, accessories, and properties. There are a number of places where people go to do shopping, mostly in malls, shopping centres, and markets. A recent trend has set the industry in a frenzy since online shopping has simplified the struggle and effort that was previously experienced. You can comfortably shop online and receive your goods within a few hours, depending on your retailer. Demand for products and services is influenced by the satiety levels that vary in each individual. We also have different tastes and preferences, which makes shopping a way of life. However, there is a controlled way of doing things, which implies that you should not overindulge in the shopping exercise to avoid accumulating debts or forming a spendthrift habit.
Let us get an insight into how you should go shopping in the market today.
Window shopping
This is one of the old traditions that entails a prior visit to the market stalls intending to familiarize yourself with a new product. Needs drive people, tastes, and preferences, and making the right decision is paramount. There is no need to purchase a product that you will later regret its value and aesthetic properties simply because you did shop in a hurry. Window shopping aims at clearing all your doubts and perception towards a particular product or service. People who like to compare notes with previous research also get to benefit from window shopping. Ultimately, you will come up with a decision to purchase or pass the item.
Tradeshows
Another popular way to go shopping in the market is to visit tradeshows that are mostly associated with auto goods. Tradeshows also tend to reveal updated versions with later release to the market, which helps most buyers prepare adequately to own an asset. As the buyer, it is always a nice idea to find tradeshows that represent a brand you might be interested in possessing. It helps you save time since tradeshows are organized in long time intervals. People who develop an interest in brands already in the display could commence with the negotiations to buy an interesting brand.
Retail
The retail industry is famous both in the online and offline world. It’s highly competitive, and people prefer retail products since they are better priced compared to what they pay in shops and stores. Ensure that you conduct a background inspection before making the ultimate decision to work with an online retailer to avoid falling prey to unscrupulous businesspeople. Shopping regularly will help you understand the retail cycle, especially in prime seasons and holidays. Once you identify a legit store, you can now add your cart list and wishlist.
Shopping the market is supposed to be a fun activity that gives you a platform to gain knowledge, inspiration, and art to make sales. Get conversant with new marketing trends since technology is changing every industry and sector. Please make use of discount offers since they will help you.

 

Camping, Travel and Learning

firephoto by @_zphotoz_

Growing up my family moved a lot. I lived in several places in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Nebraska and now in Tennessee. However it wasn’t until I was with Ian in my twenties that I really got the chance to travel and really see places. Places that were out of my comfort zone like Mexico, Italy, England, Portugal, and Spain. Now Ian is gone but he passed a love of travel, learning and exploring along to me and our children. As a single parent, I enjoyed finding new adventures with my children and made it a goal to travel with them out of the country to get out of my box. Now with our new blended family, I’m so happy to have found someone else that shares my desire to camp, travel and learn. We’ve only been a new family for about a year but at the end of this month we’ll have camped in 10 different states together. It’s been a real blessing.nature-3

My favorite part about camping is the opportunity to be out in nature and away from the hustle and bustle. I try to lead a simple life at home, however with 4 kids it still ends up to be busy and hectic at times. I welcome the change of scenery and pace of life that camping brings. I love the chance to connect with nature. Being in the trees and near the water makes a world of difference for my mental well being. The kids tend to put down their electronic devices, get on their bikes and seem to be open to more conversation. We are able to work as a family/team to set up the camper and do the cooking. There are less distractions and more focus and quiet time which we all enjoy. There is something about being away that gives you a new perspective on your everyday anxieties.

Traveling opens our eyes to the world around us. I have found by visiting different areas we become more tolerant and accepting of differences, as well as each other. Traveling teaches patience, you can’t just snap your fingers and be at your new destination, it takes time. Our kids enjoy their electronic devices on the way, don’t get me wrong. When we first started taking trips together there would often be frustrated huffing, and complaining along the way. I’m pleased to say they seemed to have found a way to enjoy the process and give up the negativity (most of the time). We’ve also found ways to use the car ride as a bonding time. We sometimes play games together, or listen to songs or books on tape. Just a little bit of effort and planning can make a world of difference for a long road trip.

As I’ve stated a bzillion times before, learning happens all of the time. It’s not contained by the walls of a classroom. Learning happens everyday, you just can’t stop it. I find traveling and camping to be an exercise in teamwork, cooperation, patience, and simplicity. There are valuable skills that will last a lifetime. When life slows down I’ve noticed that often new books are pulled off the shelves and read in an afternoon, and new projects are started and new skills learned. This is done by their choosing, at their will. This kind of learning stays with you and changes who you are, makes you a better person.

 

We have some big changes and exciting things planned for our family over the next year. It makes me nervous and excited to see things coming together. We hope to keep expanding in our travels and spend more time with our kids learning and exploring every step of the way. I have enjoyed this past week participating in the Write Tribe challenge. It has given me the chance to catch up in sharing our camping adventures over the last year. I hope you will keep joining us for our journeys.

What are you favorite places to travel with your family? What have you learned? Suggestions where we should camp next?

Croft State Park

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photo by @z_photoz_on Instagram

We were on our way for a convention in Orangeburg, SC but we had a few extra days we could add to the trip so we thought we’d test out a new state park along the way. Poose came up with Croft State Park which was in Spartanburg, SC.  It was a good decision. We didn’t realize it at the time we made our reservation, but it’s an equestrian park. So as we were pulling in we noticed everyone had horse trailers, and we we saw a show arena for horses, so Big Z and Pee Wee were particularly excited about this. They had taken horse back riding lessons this year, and have a fondness for horses.

 

Croft State Park has a unique history to it we would learn. It was originally a military base in it’s early years. There was an army infantry training camp that at one point hosted over 250,000 soldiers, it closed in the 1940’s and was opened up as a state park afterwards.  It was called Camp Croft after a military general, and prior to that the area served as a prisoner of war camp for World War I, and held approximately 250 Germans POWs. Now this beautiful state park has over 7,000 acres of trails, farmlands, old homesteads, cemeteries, lakes and woodlands. It’s become a popular destination for hiking, biking, fishing, boating and for bringing your horses. There are trails made for horseback riding and an arena for horse shows. We were fortunate enough to get a glimpse at one of the horse shows.

 

We rented kayaks for the big kids, and then a John boat for me, Poose and Lil’ Z. It was March but the weather was beautiful, as so often seems to be the case in South Carolina. The sun was shining and the skies were blue. We all spent the afternoon rowing around Lake Craig. We were able to get Lil’ Z a bamboo fishing rod at the welcome center and he was able to give fishing a try. Compared to other state parks we have visited, we found the rental rates for their boats to be very reasonable. The Park Rangers were extremely friendly and helpful in answering all of our questions.

The campground itself was a nice little loop where the kids could ride their bikes. It was just a short walk from the show arena. Most campers in our loop had their horse trailers with them, and were clearly there for to enjoy time on the trails with their horses or there to show their horses.  There was another loop closer to the lake, where we will try to stay if we stay there again. It would be nice to camp so close to the lake. The facilities were nice, the showers and bathrooms were always clean and they are located central to all of the camp sites.

We enjoyed a beautiful hike along Fairforest Creek. It was such a serene area tucked in the woods. There were sandy areas along the creek. The winding trail took us up and down where we were beginning to think we were lost. We were not of course, since we were still on the trail. It brought us back out on the road leading to the horse arena. Sunday morning the horse arena was in full use. There were beautifully groomed horses all around. It was a cool experience to see the horse show. I was surprised how young and small some of the riders were on these large horses. One girl got scared and fell off of her horse during the show, that gave me a fright. She ended up to be just fine and apparently lost control of her horse. Everyone clapped and supported her as she got back up.

We drove into Spartanburg for dinner one night. As I’ve mentioned before, we always seem to have good success with small family owned ethnic restaurants when we travel. The food is usually healthy, delicious and affordable. It seems to work well for our varied preferences. We usually can find something for the vegetarians, the meat eaters and gluten free for Perry.  This time we tried a place called A Caribbean Sweetness.  The owner, Gaston, was a very outgoing and friendly man. We arrived right before closing, but he was kind and quick to serve us and guide us in our choices. Everything was delicious. The kids enjoyed the mango smoothies and we talked about how delicious and fun the experience was on the ride home. That is a sign of a good meal.

Crazy girls in the water in March, they bet each other Starbucks, and couldn’t resist. 

We loved our time in Spartanburg, even though it was brief. Croft State Park was the refreshing nature break that we needed. We were so happy to be in some sunshine and we could feel that spring was in the air. We especially enjoyed our fun out on the lake.The girls took it to the next level, and decided to jump in the water. They challenged each other, and they weren’t about to back down. So in they went, silly girls!

When you camp what activities do you enjoy most? For us, we love being out on the water. This was so great to be out on the lake in the sunshine in March. I hope we’ll go back to Croft State Park in the not so distant future.

Paris Mountain State Park in Greenville, SC

Downtown Greenville, SC Photo by @z_photoz_ on Instagram

Downtown Greenville, SC Photo by @z_photoz_ on Instagram

So I’ve been doing this write tribe challenge this week and have been catching up writing about our travels over the past year. As a new blended family we just reached our year mark last month. It’s been fun for us to bond while we camp at different state parks not too far from home. Sometimes we get the opportunity to travel when Poose gets invited to share a bible lecture in American Sign Language at a local Deaf congregation. That was the situation that brought us to Greenville, SC.  When we get invited to attend a deaf congregation we always research what state parks are nearby so we can start planning our camping trip. We were happy to find that Paris Mountain State Park was close where we needed to be in Greenville,SC.


Paris Mountain State Park is a smaller state park but with very nice camping facilities. There were paved camping sites for us to park our RV. This always makes things a little nicer when it comes to being level. We traveled to Paris Mountain in February, and had perfect weather for our trip. The kids enjoyed riding their bikes around the camping area and we had the chance to hike a few trails. The  park is surrounding Lake Placid which has a nice trail that circles the lake. Lil’ Z and I took a morning and explored wildlife and other cool things from nature on the Lake Placid Trail. It was an easy trail that took us below the dam and around the lake. We had a fun time seeing the ducks and squirrels on that quiet morning of our hike.

We went into Greenville for dinner and found a fantastic place called thePita House. They served authentic middle eastern dishes, it was so delicious. There is a middle eastern market attached to the restaurant, we had fun there too. I often find that finding delicious ethnic food is often cheaper and most always more delicious than eating at a chain restaurant with the same ole foods.

Downtown Greenville photo by @z_photoz_ on Instagram

I found Greenville to be a unique and beautiful town. It’s definitely a town designed to make you want to walk around, hang out and enjoy the people and the scenery. Falls Park is an incredible downtown space designed with  plenty of space for kids to enjoy nature and families to relax together. My very favorite park of the park was the beautiful exposed root system of one of the trees along one of the walkways, it was like a piece of art in in itself. Our family enjoyed an afternoon just walking around Downtown Greenville. I was so impressed with the cleanliness of the town, the friendliness of the people and the beautiful layout of the city. The Liberty Bridge just begs for you to walk across and see what awaits on the other side. There was something for everyone in our family. Perry was  even thrilled to find a gluten free bakery.

Have you ever visited Greenville, SC? Where are your favorite places to camp? Do you have a favorite State Park?

Santee State Park

The fishing pier at Santee State Park, SC

Our family truly enjoys camping and spending time outdoors. Before Pooseand I got married, each of us separately enjoyed camping with our children. I bought an old van that I used with my kids for camping, we’d take our tents and we’d enjoy our food over the open fire. Poose had a big 32 foot camper, with an outside kitchen and all the bells and whistles. It has been interesting for us to meet in the middle in our ideal camping experiences.

One of our first adventures together as a blended family was to Santee, SC.  Poose, PeeWee and Perry had camped there before with Lisa, ( Poose’s former wife, and Perry and PeeWee’s mother)ante before she passed away. They spoke highly of the beauty of the campground. We were attending a convention for the deaf nearby, and chose the Cypress View campground for the duration of our stay. I much prefer nature as my backdrop than the inside of a dingy hotel room anytime.

santee3The sunset at Santee is breathtaking

I was very impressed with Santee State Park. It is in a very serene setting. There are small walking trails meandering off of the main road of the campground. There are many trees throughout the campground making it feel cozy and unexposed. You can walk along beautiful Lake Marion, see the boats skimming across the water and watch people fishing. There is a pier nearby where we tried our hand out at fishing, but to no avail. There is even a beach type area where the kids were able to wade into the water.

Santee Park does offer rentals of Stand up Paddle Boards, kayaks and canoes through an agency that has a small hut set up there. We did rent a kayak and paddle board for an hour. It was extremely overpriced compared to other state parks where we’ve rented kayaks. The kids had fun nonetheless. It was just our pocketbook that was hurting at the moment. Overall though, the cost of camping with a family of 6 is  much more inexpensive than staying in a hotel, so we still saved money. There is a playground area , and small pier cabins that are available to rent.

The facilities are kept clean for the most part. Like most State Park restrooms, they are nothing fancy, but serve there purpose. We all take our water shoes to wear in the showers. Take your own soap, because there isn’t usually any at the sinks. We found the staff to be friendly and helpful. There is a small store near the pier that also offers a small wi-fi hot spot for those techies in your life.

One great experience we had was meeting some neighboring campers. It was three families together that happened to have children the same ages of our children. We had a wonderful evening together with the adults talking and sharing stories. The children played some pretty crazy card games and listened to music under the stars. It made for a wonderful trip, and we hope to meet up with those friends again. Our kids still keep in touch.

Santee State Park is a place where we camp about 3 times a year. We always enjoy it. Lake Shore campground was sadly destroyed by some flooding and storms, and is still closed. We have found the Cypress View campground to fit our needs. It offers beautiful views, a relaxing atmosphere and affordable clean campground amenities. It’s a great option for family camping.

Grief (and learning)

grief_urn

Our family has experienced great loss throughout the years. First I lost my beautiful baby girl, Bella. Then 5 years later I have lost my first husband, Ian, suddenly. My current husband, Poose, had a similar loss with his wife. So all four of our children have experienced the loss of a parent, and two have also experienced the loss of a sibling. Our family has know heartbreak from all angles.

Grief isn’t something you can deal with for a specific amount of time, then be done with it. It keeps rearing it’s head over the years again and again. Memory, concentration and learning are all affected by grief, this is especially the case with children. Children need patience and an emotionally safe space while dealing with all of these intense emotions. Grief disrupts your mind and your thinking abilities, and this isn’t necessarily for just a short period of time. Complicated grief can show up years later and affect memory for good.
Children and adults can feel spread to thin with every little task seeming insurmountable. So a burdening school schedule can simply be too much for them to handle. While providing routine can be comforting to children experiencing grief, rigidity and busy schedules are overwhelming. Allowing children to follow their curiosities when they resurface, allowing them to take the lead as to what they want to learn can ease the burden of their grief, and provide that emotional support they need at such a hard time.
Processing grief and working through the anger, the denial, and depression of it all is a learning experience in itself. Providing the walls of support for the child to be able to build a life again is important. They may not be thrilled about their new life, but with time and space they an learn to be happy again and adjust to their new reality. Surrounding them in a loving, supportive environment at home with those that love them most, can help them to deal with the complicated emotional road they are taking.
In my experience in dealing with grieving children, keeping them with a simple, not over complicated schedule helps them to deal with the grieving process in a healthy manner. Spending times outdoors and not in the confines of the classroom can do much for our emotional well being. They are learning, it maybe not be out of a textbook, but they are learning how to cope with life and the sorrow that comes with it.
What has been your experience in dealing with grief?

The Old Bailey House

Welcome to the September 2014 Carnival of Natural Parenting: Home Tour
This post was written for inclusion in the monthly Carnival of Natural Parenting hosted by Hobo Mama and Code Name: Mama. This month our participants have opened up their doors and given us a photo-rich glimpse into how they arrange their living spaces.
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I love my house, I knew from the instant that we walked in approximately 13 years ago that this was where I wanted to live. It has character and style. It’s has soul and a beautiful history about it.
It was built in approximately 1890. The mayor lived here and there was a store in the front corner of the yard. There was a post office in the area behind our house and the town doctor lived next store. Sadly all of that is now gone. The glory days of the house didn’t end, however. Ed Bailey, five-time All-Star professional baseball player was raised here. That is when the house was given its name, The Old Bailey House.

The view out our window.

Nothing is even and there are no clear corners in the house. It is crooked and leaning, but I like it that way. We don’t have many doors, except for on the bathroom,(which is kind of a necessity). There are hardwood floors throughout the house, with lots of crown molding and tin looking ceilings on the bottom level. All of the bedrooms are upstairs, again with no doors. There are two old fireplaces, and large wooden beams highlight the kitchen.

In recent years, however, my house has become a great source of frustration. Old houses require a lot of patient upkeep. Since I’m a single parent now, I have kind of dropped the ball in that area. I guess I just don’t have the know how to keep up with it all, so as a result this last year has been filled with many growing pains. It’s been a struggle to find competent workers that do quality work at a decent price. One man just ran away with $600. of my money, never to return. There are also such a wide variety of opinions on what needs to be done, that it often leaves me frozen with indecision.

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Our dining room

This year I’ve had to spend a lot of my focus on our kitchen. I’ve had to replace the kitchen countertops twice this year. I first used bamboo counter tops, but they molded almost right away, so then I went with a ceramic tile. We replaced the floors. There were over 5 layers of flooring underneath. I was shocked when we found the most beautiful, thick hardwood had been covered up with linoleum.

The process took a lot longer than I was originally expecting. Our dining room was filled with boxes for months. I was so thrilled when we were finally able to put everything back into the kitchen and use our dining room again.

stove-backsplash

The backsplash behind the stove is a lot of small tiles. I had new cupboards put in around the corner from the stove. By the way, don’t you love the old stove. It’s so cute. Old homes never have enough storage, so I also had the large cupboard to the left of the stove installed. It has large pull out drawers which work perfectly for pantry items.

Do you love old homes, or prefer the convenience of a nice, new home? My parents love new homes and having everything perfect and neat. I am content with crooked and cute. You?
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Carnival of Natural Parenting -- Hobo Mama and Code Name: MamaVisit Hobo Mama and Code Name: Mama to find out how you can participate in the next Carnival of Natural Parenting!
Please take time to read the submissions by the other carnival participants:
(This list will be updated by afternoon September 9 with all the carnival links.)

  • Being Barlow Home Tour — Follow along as Jessica at Being Barlow gives you the tour of her family’s home.
  • A Tour Of My Hybrid Rasta Kitchen — Jennifer at Hybrid Rasta Mama takes you on a tour of her kitchen complete with a Kombucha Corner, a large turtle, her tea stash, and of course, all her must-have kitchen gadgets. Check out Hybrid Rasta Mama’s most favorite space!
  • Dreaming of a Sisters Room — Bianca, The Pierogie Mama, dreams, schemes and pins ideas for when her younger daughter is ready to move out of the family bed and share a room with her older sister.
  • Building a life — Constructing a dream — Survivor at Surviving Mexico-Adventures and Disasters shows you a glimpse inside the home her family built and talks about adaptions they made in constructing their lives in Mexico.
  • Why I’m Sleeping in the Dining Room — Becca at The Earthling’s Handbook welcomed a new baby but didn’t have a spare bedroom. She explains how her family rearranged the house to create Lydia’s nursing nest and changed room in spaces they already had.
  • The Gratitude Tour — Inspired by Momastry’s recent “home tour,” That Mama Gretchen is highlighting imperfect snapshots of things she’s thankful for around her home. Don’t plan to pin anything!
  • Our Home in the Forest — Tara from Up the Dempster gives you a peek into life lived off-grid in Canada’s Yukon Territory.
  • natural bedding for kids — Emma at Your Fonder Heart shows you how her family of 3 (soon to be 4) manages to keep their two cotton & wool beds clean and dry (plus a little on the end of cosleeping — for now).
  • I love our home — ANonyMous at Radical Ramblings explains how lucky she feels to have the home she does, and why she strives so hard to keep it tidy.
  • Not-So-Extreme Makeover: Sunshine and Rainbows Edition — Dionna at Code Name: Mama was tired of her dark, outdated house, so she brightened it up and added some color.
  • Our little outdoor space — Tat at Mum in search invites you to visit her balcony, where her children make friends with wildlife.
  • Our Funky, Bright, Eclectic, Montessori Home — Rachel at Bread and Roses shows you her family’s newly renovated home and how it’s set up with Montessori principles in mind for her 15-month-old to have independence.
  • Beach cottage in progress — Ever tried to turn a 1980s condo into a 1920s beach bungalow? Lauren at Hobo Mama is giving it a try!
  • Conjuring home: intention in renovation — Jessica at Crunchy-Chewy Mama explains why she and her husband took on a huge renovation with two little kids and shares the downsides and the ups, too.
  • Learning At Home — Kerry at City Kids Homeschooling helps us to re-imagine the ordinary spaces of our homes to ignite natural learning.
  • My Dining Room Table — Kellie at Our Mindful Life loves her dining room table — and everything surrounding it!
  • Sight words and life lessons — The room that seemed to fit the least in Laura from Pug in the Kitchen‘s life is now host to her family’s homeschool adventures and a room they couldn’t imagine life without!
  • A Tour of Our Church — Garry at Postilius invites you virtually visit him in the 19th-century, one-room church where he lives with his spouse and two kids.
  • Preparing a Montessori Baby-Toddler Space at Home — Deb Chitwood at Living Montessori Now shares the Montessori baby-toddler space she’s created in the main living area of her home along with a variety of resources for creating a Montessori-friendly home.
  • The Old Bailey House — Come peek through the window of The Old Bailey House where Erica at ChildOrganics resides with her little ones.
  • My New House Not-Monday: The Stairs — Claire at The Adventures of Lactating Girl shows you her new laminate stairs in her not-so-new-anymore house.
  • To Minimalist and Back Again — Jorje of Momma Jorje shares how she went to the extreme as a minimalist and bounced right back. Read how she finds it difficult to maintain the minimalist lifestyle when upsizing living space.
  • Our Life As Modern-Day Nomads — This family of five lives in 194 square feet of space — with the whole of North America as a back yard. Paige of Our Road Less Traveled guest posts at Natural Parents Network.

Everyday Superheroes

Welcome to the March 2014 Carnival of Natural Parenting: Everyday Superheroes
This post was written for inclusion in the monthly Carnival of Natural Parenting hosted by Hobo Mama and Code Name: Mama. This month our participants have talked about the remarkable people and characteristics that have touched their lives. Please read to the end to find a list of links to the other carnival participants.
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“It is surmounting difficulties that makes heroes.” -Lajos Kossoth

Superhero Austin

This has been a tough month for the Walker-Warburg Syndrome (WWS)  Facebook Family. Because WWS is extremely rare, most of us never meet anyone else in person that has the disorder. Thankfully due to the internet we can now connect with other families dealing with WWS. Many of the babies struggled in and out of the hospital with infections and breathing issues through the winter. Sadly, two of our sweet WWS boys passed away during the month of February. These babies are my superheroes.

My daughter Bella suffered from Walker-Warburg Syndrome. I wrote more about that, here, here and here. To briefly summarize the rare genetic disorder is characterized by Muscular Dystrophy, blindness (microphthalmia), Hydrocephalus and Lissencephaly. Most parents are given the diagnosis at the 20-week ultrasound. We are usually offered an abortion, which clearly the parents in this facebook group have declined. We’ve chosen a different path.

We’ve chosen to live with the uncertainty, the heartbreak, the struggle. Please don’t forget that we’ve also chosen love, life, and joy. Yes, joy wiggles it’s way in there when you choose love and life. These sweet babies have only entered our life for a short time, but they left an impression that will last. They may be small but they teach mighty lessons. Mostly I feel they taught us all a lesson in unconditional love. Their lives were important and they mattered.

“The hero is commonly the simplest and obscurest of men.”-Thoreau

Superhero or Rock Star?? -My Sweet Bella

Superheroes exhibit extraordinary strength and power. Here are a few superheroes that have touched my life:

My Bella. I witnessed her strength up close and personal. She was strong beyond words, as I believe all of these Walker-Warburg babies are. I know her life wasn’t comfortable. I know she suffered through seizures and surgeries. But most of all, I know she was loved.

Baby Austin- I haven’t met Baby Austin in person, I’ve met him through the WWS facebook group. It’s his family that gave me the inspiration for this post. They often dressed him in Superman clothes and refer to him as their little superhero, and that he was. He fought for 9 months and passed away in his Momma’s armsFebruary 16, 2014. You can see his facebook page, and learn more of his story here.

Baby Evan- Another sweet baby I’ve only been able to know via the internet. His chubby cheeks and happy disposition reminded me of my sweet girl. This superhero passed away on February 22, 2014. You can learn more about Evan HERE and support his family HERE.

Baby Evan

Every superhero has a sidekick, these superheroes are no exception. The families that supported these sweet superheroes can not be forgotten. They are left behind to carry the torch with a broken hearts and empty cradles. They leave behind big brothers and sister. But most of all they leave behind memories that will be cherished forever.

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Visit Hobo Mama and Code Name: Mama to find out how you can participate in the next Carnival of Natural Parenting!

Please take time to read the submissions by the other carnival participants:

(This list will be updated by afternoon March 11 with all the carnival links.)

  • I Am A Super Hero — Jennifer at Hybrid Rasta Mama shares how she learned the hard way exactly what it means to be a real superhero and not a burned out shell of a human simply pretending to be one.
  • Quiet Heroics — Heroism doesn’t have to be big and bold. Read how Jorje of Momma Jorje is a quiet hero…and how you probably are, too.
  • Not a Bang, but a Whisper {Carnival of Natural Parenting} — Meegs at A New Day talks about the different types of “superheroes,” ones that come in with a bang and ones that come in with a whisper.
  • Silent courage of motherhood in rural Cambodia — Nathalie at Kampuchea Crossings marvels at how rural Khmer women defy the odds in childbirth.
  • Super Pappy — Mother Goutte‘s little boy met a superhero in checked slippers and Volkswagen Polo, his grand dad: Super Pappy!
  • An Open Letter to Batman — Kati at The Best Things challenges Batman to hold up his end of the deal, in the name of social justice, civic duty, and a little boy named Babe-O!
  • My Village — Kellie at Our Mindful Life reflects on the people who helped her to become her best self.
  • 5 Lessons My Kids Taught Me — Children are amazing teachers, when we only stop to listen. They remind us to choose happiness, to delight in the small things, to let go and forgive. There is so much we can learn from our children. Justine at The Lone Home Ranger shares a few of the lessons she’s learned.
  • Could you use some superpowers? — Tat at Mum in search shares a fun activity to help you connect with your own superpowers.
  • Like Fire Engines — Tam at tinsenpup tells the story of the day she saw a surprising superhero lurking in the guise of her not entirely mild-mannered four-year-old daughter.
  • Everyday Superheroes — Erica at ChildOrganics shares her list of Walker Warburg Syndrome Superheroes that have touched her life forever.
  • My Superhero of the Week: Nancy Gallagher — Tribal Mama muses about the transcendent things her superhero mom has done.
  • My choice in natural birth does not make me a super hero — Bianca, The Pierogie Mama, discusses her thoughts on her experience with the perception of natural birth and putting those mamas on a different level. Does giving birth naturally give cause for an extra pat on the back? No! All mamas, no matter how they birth, are superheroes.
  • Someone’s Hero — Sometimes being a parent means pretending to be a grown-up, but it always means you are someone’s hero. Read Mandy’s lament at Living Peacefully with Children.
  • Growing into a Super Hero — Casey at Joyful Courage shares how owning our behavior and choosing to be a better parent, a better person, is an act of courage.
  • A Math Superhero — Kerry at City Kids Homeschooling writes that her 7-year-old daughter’s superhero is an MIT-trained mathematician.
  • It Starts With Truffula Trees And Tulips — Luschka of Diary of a First Childtakes a hard look at the realities of her relationship with her mother, and through this post goes on a journey of discovery that ends in a surprise realisation for her.
  • We Don’t Need an Excuse — Maria Kang (aka “Hot Mom”) asks women #WhatsYourExcuse for not being in shape? Dionna at Code Name: Mamaasks Hot Mom what her excuse is for not devoting her life to charity work, or fostering dozens of stray dogs each year, or advocating for the needs of others. Better yet, Code Name: Mama says, how about we realize that every woman has her own priorities. Focus on your own, and stop judging others for theirs.
  • It’s not heroic when you’re living it — Lauren at Hobo Mama knows from the inside that homeschooling does not take a hero, and that much of what we choose as parents is simply what works best for us.
  • Superheroes, princesses and preschoolers — Garry at Postilius discusses why his preschool-age son is not ready for comic book superheroes.
  • The Loving Parents of Children with Special Needs – Everyday Superheroes — Deb Chitwood at Living Montessori Now shares posts with resources for parents of children with special needs along with posts to help others know how to support parents of children with special needs.
  • Everyday Empathy — Mommy Giraffe of Little Green Giraffe shares why her secret superpower is everyday empathy.
  • The Simplicity of Being a Superhero — Ana at Panda & Ananaso explains what superheroes mean to her wise three-year-old.
  • My Father, The Hero — Fathers are pretty amazing; find out why Christine at The Erudite Mom thinks hers is the bees knees.